Find the Best Japanese Festivals & Events on the Web

December 2022 Events    Popular Popular ObonsJun-Sep  New Japanese Festivals: 27 Fred Korematsu DayFeb Day of RemembranceFeb Cherry Blossom Events  Cherry Blossom LocationsFeb-Apr Cherry Blossom Map Boy's DayMay Largest Music ShowJun

  Los Angeles

 Nisei Week Events & Tips in Little TokyoAug 2022 Auto Car ShowNov
Obon Festivals & Practice:  10 Jun-Aug  Popular Obon FestivalsJun-Aug  Obon Festivals (Only):  10 Jun-Aug  Obon Practices (Only):  0 Jun-Aug  Obon MapJun-Aug
 
Los Angeles has Free Admission!NEW 

Explore 

All Japantowns 

Find 

Best Japanese Places 

 

Japantown Maps 

Let's Go to Japan

 Japan TravelNew    Add Event

Explore All Japanese Events & Locations

Show Menu
2022 40th Annual Kotohajime: Hatsu-U (初卯) - First Performance of the Year! - ONLINE
2023 Oshogatsu Family Festival Event - Year of the Rabbit - JANM (Free Event All Day)
2022 Artist Yayoi Kusama Aftermath of Obliteration of Eternity - The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
2023 - The 61st Annual Sakura Matsuri Japanese Street Festival (Largest Exhibition Event of Japanese Culture in the United States) 2 Days
2023 Annual Diablo Japanese Summer Festival Event - Bon Odori (2 Days) Japanese Food Booths, Taiko, Games..
2022 Life Cycles | A Bamboo Exploration with Tanabe Chikuunsai IV (Exhibition 07-28 to 01-15-2023)
2022 Ippakutei Tea House Tour Open House/Guided Tour Presented by JICC, Embassy of Japan
2023 Monterey Peninsula Buddhist 75st Annual Temple Obon Festival (Sunday) Bon Odori, Japanese Food, Entertainment, Ikebana Exhibits, Games, Crafts..
2023 West Covina Buddhist Temple Obon Festival - East San Gabriel Valley - Bon Odori Dancing, Taiko, Japanese Food, Martial Arts, Games.. (Sat Only)
March 11, 2011 Japan Anniversary Earthquake & Tsunami that Struck Japan & Radioactive Detection in the Pacific Coast Ocean - Help Japan
2022 The Samurai Collection - 25 Year Collection Focused on Japanese Samurai Armor - Largest Collection Outside of Japan-Anne & Gabriel Barbier-Muller
2023 Japanese New Year Event - Shōgatsu
2023 Higashi Hongwanji Virtual Obon Festival - Bon Odori, Live Music..

Buddhist Church of Sacramento

Buddhist Church of Sacramento | Japanese-City.com
Location

Event Location

2401 Riverside Blvd.
Sacramento, CA 95818

For Map Directions: Click Orange Icon
Map of Buddhist Church of Sacramento, 2401 Riverside Blvd.

The Buddhist Church of Sacramento Hongwanji Betsuin and its Sangha (congregation) extend a warm welcome to you to share with us the Dharma (teachings) as taught by Sakyamuni Buddha and expounded by Shinran Shonin.

We hope the following information will provide a brief picture of the history and affliation of our temple, the religious, educational and social programs offered, and the affiliated and sponsored organizations associated with our Betsuin. Please join us each Sunday at 9:30am.

Annual Obon Event
The word 'Matsuri' or 'Festival' literally means worshipping gods or ancestral spirits. Festivals were usually annual events to bless the cultivation of rice and the health of the community. In order to enliven the celebrations, there were performances of traditional dances and musical instruments.

Obon is a Japanese Buddhist festival usually held in mid-July or August for a week and is a time when the souls of dead ancestors are supposed to return home for three days. In particular, prayers are said for anyone who has died in the previous year as it is believed that they need more guidance to find their way. The festival has been held since the 7th century although many of the events have changed and it is one of the most significant and enjoyable of the Japanese festivals. It goes by a variety of names, the most popular of which is 'The Festival or Feast of the Dead'.

While it is not a public holiday, many Japanese who work in the city visit their birthplace at this time every year to clean the gravesites of their ancestors. Others clean Buddhist altars in their home although fewer people have these. Many years ago, Obon and the holiday on January 15th were the only days servants and workers were released to return to their homes.

Vegetables, fruits and rice wine are left out for the spirits to eat. Flowers decorate the graves or altar and incense is burned. This is the time for the living to show their respect to their ancestors. But it is not just the spirits who are given food and drink!

The Modern Festival

During the celebratory week of Obon, bright red lanterns are hung everywhere. In actual fact, these lanterns were originally to guide the dead spirits home from the spirit world and then back again, but they are usually lit at night for the festival dances.

The celebrations are held in the square, temple or a vacant block of each town. A temporary wooden tower is erected in the centre and, at the top of the tower, a taiko drummer plays. Sometimes this is a recording instead, but generally it's a real drummer. Large speakers at the top of the tower play special Obon music and men and women in 'yukata' or summer, cotton kimonos circle the tower dancing 'bonodori'.

Bonodori are easy, rhythmic, repetitive dances. Each movement in the dance has a special significance such as digging, threshing wheat and so on. These dances are important because it is said they soothe the spirits of the dead during their visit. This type of dancing can be learned outside the Obon Festival but it is very simple to join in and pick it up as you go. It is worth noting that these traditional dances vary from district to district, as does the music.

The light of the lanterns also shines on many stalls around the outside of the square with everything from corn on skewers to sweet toffee to grilled eel. Games booths are available, too, with games like trying to catch a goldfish with a rice-paper scoop before it dissolves. Stallholders wear 'happi' coats with big Japanese characters written on them and often people in the same area or club will have the same colour and symbol on their jackets.

Bonfires and fireworks are common despite the heat, and children (and adults!) go from town to town to see the different displays and dancing. Kyoto is particularly renowned for its Obon Festival because of the displays of rafts with fires on that are released into the river at the end of the week. Most other areas no longer do the burning rafts because of environmental concerns. These fiery rafts are to guide the ancestors back to the spirit world.

At the end of the week of festivities, bonfires and fireworks reach their peak and the temporary festival areas are dismantled. Everyone returns to the cities causing traffic congestion both on the roads and in public transport which is often crowded to double capacity. Obon has finished for another year, and presumably the ancestral spirits return to their world as well!

Annual Events
Buddhist Church of Sacramento Obon, Summer

Contact


Phone: (916) 446-0121

Location Website

Website: Click to Visit

  (For Event Infomation See Event Website Page)
Japanese Festival Events At This Location

    There Are No Current Japanese Events


     Click to Submit Japanese Events.


Authentic Japanese Gardens in the United States


Best Japanese Gardens in the United States

Japanese Rock 'Zen' Gardens in the United States


Best Japanese Rock 'Zen' Gardens in the United States

Japanese Teahouses in the United States


Best Japanese Teahouses in the United States