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226-Year-Old Japanese Temple Bell, U.S. National Arboretum


226-Year-Old Japanese Temple Bell, U.S. National Arboretum | Japanese-City.com
Location

Event Location

3501 New York Ave NE
Washington, DC 20002
 
Map of 226-Year-Old Japanese Temple Bell, U.S. National Arboretum, 3501 New York Ave NE, Washington

A 226-year-old Japanese temple bell was inaugurated at the U.S. National Arboretum in Washington, D.C., on New Year's Day. The bell, a gift from the National Bell Festival, marked a special event in the capital. During the ceremony, the ancient bell resonated in the central courtyard, accompanied by a Zen Buddhist blessing and remarks from speakers. Attendees were treated to four traditional Japanese teas as part of the celebration. The National Bell Festival focuses on the restoration of bells and bell towers globally.

Additional information you might find interesting about the 226-year-old Japanese temple bell at the U.S. National Arboretum:

History and Origins
• The bell was cast in 1798, during the Kansei era of Japanese history.
• It belonged to the Daisen monastery, located in the Tama district near Tokyo, which no longer exists.
• A monk named Myōdō led a fundraising campaign for the bell's creation.

Details and Significance
• The bell, known as a 'hanshō,' is 27 inches tall and weighs 80 pounds.
• It was a gift from the National Bell Festival, an organization dedicated to preserving bells and bell towers worldwide.
• Its inauguration on New Year's Day 2024 marked a symbolic moment, blending Japanese cultural heritage with American celebration.
• The bell's presence at the National Bonsai & Penjing Museum strengthens the connection between Japanese art, history, and nature.

Further Exploration
 You can find photos and videos of the bell online, including from the inauguration ceremony.
• The National Bell Festival website might offer more information about the bell's restoration and journey to the Arboretum.
• The National Bonsai & Penjing Museum website or social media might have details about visiting the bell and its cultural significance.

Interesting Details You Might Not Have Known
• The bell's inscription commemorates its dedication to the Buddha and a local deity.
• The bell-ringing technique can be quite intricate, involving specific striking points and rhythms.
• Temple bells were traditionally used for various purposes, from signaling time to marking religious ceremonies.

 

   

Contact

Phone: (202) 245-4523

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