Popular  Japanese Festivals: 77   New   Places To Go  Landmarks  Japan TravelNew!      Add Event
   Little Tokyo - San Francisco - Seattle - San Jose - West LA (Sawtelle)
Obon Festivals & Practice:  143   Popular Obon Festivals  Obon Festivals (Only):  71   Obon Practices (Only):  72   Obon Map 
×
2019 Bon Odori Dance Practice - Tacoma Buddhist Temple
2019 - 30th Annual Obon and Taiko Festival, Eugene Oregon - Alton Baker Park (Saturday)
2019 Idaho Oregon Buddhist Temple Obon Odori Practice
2019 Bon Odori Practice - Mountain View Buddhist Temple (Traditional Obon Odori Dance Practice)
2019 - 7th Annual Philadelphia Obon Festival - Taiko, Tea Ceremony, Games, Crafts, Dance (Saturday)
2019 Heart Mountain Pilgrimage (3 Days: Thu - Sat)
2019 Studio Ghibli Fest - 3rd Annual Studio Ghibli Fest to Experience the Wonder of 9 Beloved, Groundbreaking Animated Films
2019 - 32nd Annual Southern California Japanese Surfing Contest
Historic Exhibition of 16 Centuries of Animals in Japanese Art Will Showcase Masterpieces That Rarely Leave Japan
2019 - Memphis Japan Festival (Celebrate the History, Culture & People of Japan) Japanese Food, Origami, Bonsai, Games, Martial Arts.. (Sunday)
2019 - 2nd Annual Keiro no Hi Festival - A Japanese Holiday to Honor & Celebrate Older Adults - JACCC
2019 Annual Ogden Buddhist Church Obon Bon Odori Festival - Live Taiko, Food, Lanterns..
2019 Annual Marysville Obon Summer Festival - Marysville Buddhist Church (Saturday) Live Taiko, Japanese Food, Dancing..

Japanese New Year - ShōgatsuNewly Listed

Date: Friday, 1 January, 2027       Time: All Day
Location
1st street
Los Angeles, CA 90012

Website: Click to Visit

The Japanese New Year (shōgatsu) is one of the most important annual festivals, with its own unique customs, and has been celebrated for centuries. Due to the importance of the holiday and the preparations required, the preceding days are quite busy, particularly the day before, known as Ōmisoka.

The Japanese New Year has been celebrated since 1873 according to the Gregorian calendar, on January 1 of each year (New Year's Day where the Gregorian calendar is used).

History
Prior to the Meiji Period, the date of the Japanese New Year was based on the Chinese lunar calendar, as are the contemporary Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese New Years. However, in 1873, five years after the Meiji Restoration, Japan adopted the Gregorian calendar and the first day of January became the official and cultural New Year's Day.

Traditional food
Japanese people eat a special selection of dishes during the New Year celebration called osechi-ryōri, typically shortened to osechi. This consists of boiled seaweed, fish cakes, mashed sweet potato with chestnut, simmered burdock root, and sweetened black soybeans. Many of these dishes are sweet, sour, or dried, so they can keep without refrigeration-the culinary traditions date to a time before households had refrigerators, when most stores closed for the holidays. There are many variations of osechi, and some foods eaten in one region are not eaten in other places (or are considered unfortunate or even banned) on New Year's Day. Another popular dish is ozōni, a soup with omochi and other ingredients that differ based on various regions of Japan. Today, sashimi and sushi are often eaten, as well as non-Japanese foods. To let the overworked stomach rest, seven-herb rice soup is prepared on the seventh day of January, a day known as jinjitsu.

Bell Ringing
At midnight on December 31, Buddhist temples all over Japan ring their bells a total of 108 times to symbolize the 108 human sins in Buddhist belief, and to get rid of the 108 worldly desires regarding sense and feeling in every Japanese citizen. A major attraction is The Watched Night bell, in Tokyo. Japanese believe that the ringing of bells can rid off their sins during the previous year. After they are done ringing the bells, they celebrate and feast on soba noodles.

Mochi
Another custom is creating rice cakes. Boiled sticky rice is put into a wooden shallow bucket-like container and patted with water by one person while another person hits it with a large wooden mallet. Mashing the rice, it forms a sticky white dumpling. This is made before New Year's Day and eaten during the beginning of January.

Mochi is made into a New Year's decoration called kagami mochi, formed from two round cakes of mochi with a bitter orange placed on top. The name daidai is supposed to be auspicious since it means "several generations."

Because of mochi's extremely sticky texture, there is usually a small number of choking deaths around New Year in Japan, particularly amongst the elderly. The death toll is reported in newspapers in the days after New Year.

-Wikipedia

Save Event & Festivals

iCalendar
Google Calendar
Yahoo! Calendar
Windows Live Calendar

Share Event & Festivals


Categories

Comments powered by Disqus